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Posts Tagged ‘music’

New Features – Tags and Shared Items

April 4th, 2007 No comments

You may have noticed a couple new tabs across the top of the site. I’ve added a couple new features that I thought I would point out to my readers. I’ve been reluctant to do some of this stuff, but I figure I just need to embrace the whole “living online” thing and share a little more with the world. I’ve done two things – more prominent use of tags and more shared items from outside of the blog.

First up, Tags. You may have noticed the tags listed at the end of articles, but now I’ve added a small tag cloud to the right-hand sidebar. I’ve also added a dedicated tag page, which is available from the tabs across the top of the page. Currently the tag page shows both the full tag cloud (sorted alphabetically) and a “long tail” bar chart (sorted by frequency of use).

I’ve also done more to share items with readers and visitors. I’ve added the most recent articles from my “shared items” RSS feed to the left sidebar. This is done with Google Reader and a widget that Google provided. But really, I’ve focused on creating a new “shared” tab that highlights a number of aspects of my online life. There are a couple main features. I’ve tried to sort the page by putting the most transient information at the top and the longest lasting stuff at the bottom. So at the top, you’ll find what I’m currently reading from various RSS feeds that day. Below that is a summary of recent bookmarks I’ve posted to my del.icio.us account. Then we get to my personal library of books, and finally music, movies, and TV shows. The Listal portfolios don’t seem to work perfectly (they aren’t complete) but they still look cool so I’ve decided to leave the flash widgets in place rather than going with the (boring) text rolls.

I hope that you’ll find the more prominent use of tags useful and the shared items interesting. If you have other suggestions, I’d love to hear them.

Exclusive Scoop on Google Vinyl

April 1st, 2007 1 comment

After my groundbreaking investigative reporting on the upcoming 2.0 release of Delicious Library, I’ve been inundated by more rumors than a ValleyWag tip line. I’ve been seeing a lot of chatter about a secret project at Google codenamed “Google LP” that frankly didn’t make sense until just this morning.Gmail Paper
Most of you are likely familiar by now with Gmail Paper, an amazing new offering from the wizards of Mountain View. You can get hardcopies of all your email sent to you at no charge, albeit with large red ads on the back of each page. All visual attachments are also sent to you, whether those be documents or image files (no word on whether or not the glossy photo paper also has red ads on the back or not). In the notes, you’ll see that the only attachments that are not supported are audio files like MP3 and WAV files. Here’s where the secret project comes in.

Apparently, while investigating alternative methods of high-density data storage and reliable backup medium, Google has patented a new process for permanently recording audio information onto a new type of disc made from a copolymerized version of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate with small amounts of carbon black added. These improvements apparently build on the legendary work (patent # 4472295) of Fox and DiMarco, now rumored to be Google Fellows. These discs are somewhat resistant to dust (they can be wiped clean with distilled water when combined with other surfactants as additives to act as grease solvents, particularly for fingerprints) and can therefore be reliably used as removable media with a special “player” that can read the information imprinted on the surface of the vinyl disc.

This system is platform agnostic and will apparently work independently of any operating system on your computer. There is absolutely no need to be concerned about compatibility with your digital media player device. In fact, the audio output is said to be compatible with any equipment that has stereo phono input jacks.

This is where it gets exciting! Even though this project wasn’t ready for simultaneous release with Gmail Paper, this new system will allow Google to inscribe your MP3, AAC, WAV, etc. audio file attachments to these new PVC discs which Google will then mail to you for playback on the required player device. The player devices are available from a variety of manufacturers although they will be hard to find in most mainstream electronics stores for some time, although there are reports of the players being seen in high-end audio shops and, surprisingly enough, in pawn shops and thrift stores.

Here’s the final evidence. You’ll notice that in the images announcing Gmail Paper that the woman in the first picture (You click) is listening to audio content on her computer. She obviously wants to archive this material to physical media as well. BUT PICTURE #2 (We stack) WAS SUBSTITUTED AT THE LAST MINUTE when it was clear that the secret audio project wasn’t ready. Here is the original image that will go out again when the audio file support is ready.

Google Vinyl is coming, and it’s going to rock your world!

BREAKING UPDATE! – I’m trying to confirm if targeted audio ads are going to be placed on the disc between tracks or if red text ads are going to be printed on the surface of the disc. The latest rumors point to the possibility of both methods being used. There are also unsubstantiated rumors about less expensive ad placement for advertisers that don’t mind having their content show up when the discs are played backwards. The craziest rumors are that the highest priced placement will be audio ads *embedded* in your audio files at levels that are imperceptible to the conscious mind and therefore don’t affect the audio quality of your files. These are called subvinyl or perhaps sublaminate ads. Something like that – the audio was a little scratchy on the message I received.

SXSW MP3 Torrent is Up!

February 26th, 2007 No comments

The 2007 SXSW web site has a link to their Artist Showcase for acts that will be performing at this year’s festival. It’s a torrent, so you’ll need a p2p client to download this. It’s got a pretty good swarm going (I was able to download at 700KB/s). My client is still cleaning up some pieces that didn’t pass the hash check, but it shouldn’t take that long to download. I got 960 songs last year, and this year has 739 mp3’s in the first release. There will be a film torrent posted at the same page, so keep your eyes open.